“You sit and wonder just who’s gonna stop the rain,…

between-the-lines-mark-broughton1 “…Who’ll ease the sadness, who’s gonna quiet the pain.”[1]  I feel so powerless today.  Please bear with me as I am struggling to put into words what is going on inside for me today.

It started when I read the quote below earlier this morning.

“All across America and the world, families struggle with these issues, but people are more likely to cry quietly in bed than speak out. These mental health issues pose a greater risk to our well-being than, say, the Afghan Taliban or the Al Qaeda terrorists, yet in the police society there is still something of a code of silence around these topics.” [2]

I dont know why, but the three things that I looked at and listed below,[5]have brought me to this place of empty pain and sadness.

cancun-resort-mexicoI just had coffee with my friend the Colonel and am going to go see my dear, dear friend the Fanatic in a little bit. I had a wonderful conversation with my friend Renee the other day.  I got to talk with my friend Mary last night.  I got to hang out with my friend Steve yesterday for a few hours.

I sat in a DBT class yesterday as I wanted to learn about what people are talking about as being effective in helping many people with those issues we go to therapy about.

blowing-in-the-wind-chris-bardBut there is this quiet sadness that I feel as I realize the magnitude of the suffering.  The suffering, in the sense of the suffering of my culture, as well as in the sense of the suffering of those in my circle of friends and family.  My mind wants to say that this is an aberration, that I hang out with the people on the fringes, the ones who suffer with “mental illness.”  But reading Therese’s piece on Millicent Monk, and having coffee with the Colonel, I realize, I feel, the magnitude of the effects of our culture’s practice of isolation of the self and how it is manifesting as “mental illness, ” and is way more rampant than I know.

I think the best example I can give is the effects of PTSD that are being manifested in the people who were  recently in Iraq and Afghanistan.  I am only going to talk about this as a way of showing that we are not doing the things that people need to get relief from the emotional pain they suffer with.  We are not creating as Hillman says, the “vessels where we can express our pathology,” which are safe and nurturing and are necessary to healing as individuals and as a culture.

beautiful-st-kilda-scotlandWhat is amazing is that the powers that be (I am not signaling out any entity, profession or institution,) are trying to deal with the problems that those soldiers suffer with some sort of thought based therapy.[3]  The ineffectiveness of any cognitive process that is being shown with working with soldiers of war is not any different then the ineffectiveness of a cognitive based therapy for people who carry emotional traumas.[4]

beautiful-yellow-sunsetWhat that says to me is that we are not suffering with “mental illness,” as much as we are suffering from “very deep, sometimes quite forgotten damaging emotional conflicts (that) persist below the level of consciousness.”[6]    I think that until we start to see the problem this way, and deal with it in a holistic rather than an invasive manner, we are going to continue to perpetuate the problem(s) instead of starting to truly and honestly face it and start to help those of us who suffer, whether we suffer in silence or suffer with others.

123 RV, SA, RW, PA, JW

finger-touching-nose-of-babywolf-yosemite5

[1] Bruce Springsteen  The Ties that Bind, [2] Nicholas Kristoff.  I got this from Therese Borchard’s  blog below. [3] http://www.nytimes.com/2014/05/25/magazine/a-revolutionary-approach-to-treating-ptsd.html?_r=o [4] See http://www.laurakkerr.com/traumas-labyrinth/%5B6%5D Alcoholics Anonymous 12 by 12 pgs 79-80 [5]

1) Therese Borchards’s blog post about Millicent Monks, an heir to the Carnegie fortune,

http://thereseborchardblog.com/2014/07/03/mental-illness-and-the-carnegie-family-an-interview-with-millicent-monks/

2) Bill Moyer’s video on grass roots organizing about the problems that face our society, and

3) Merbear’s post on “Knocked Over By A Feather,”
http://knockedoverbyafeather.wordpress.com/2014/07/03/im-muddled/

 

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